Making Old Television Technology Make Sense

A new approach to technological television history and conservation

By Dr Paul Marshall

Abstract

How does traditional analogue television work? That’s a question beyond the comfort zone of most media historians who may not be familiar with analogue electronics. Even young engineers know little of thermionics, cathode rays and a myriad of other forgotten technologies. This important facet of television’s history is now only recorded by older engineers and by amateur groups who collect these technologies. In this paper, I will show by using examples how material artefacts can help us understand television’s history more fully.

Keywords: broadcasting, engineering, television, conservation, restoration, preservation

How to Cite: Marshall, P., 2019. Making Old Television Technology Make Sense. VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, 8(15), pp.32–45. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

Article

Read the article here: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

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