Carry on Trucking

Carry on Trucking – Jeffrey Borinsky

While many enthusiasts collect radios and televisions, broadcasting equipment is a more neglected area. The Broadcast Engineering Conservation Group (BECG) is a group of people who rescue, restore and conserve historic UK television equipment, focusing on the engineering aspects. We aim to use this to present television history to the public. Continue reading “Carry on Trucking”

Making Old Television Technology Make Sense

A new approach to technological television history and conservation

By Dr Paul Marshall

Abstract

How does traditional analogue television work? That’s a question beyond the comfort zone of most media historians who may not be familiar with analogue electronics. Even young engineers know little of thermionics, cathode rays and a myriad of other forgotten technologies. This important facet of television’s history is now only recorded by older engineers and by amateur groups who collect these technologies. In this paper, I will show by using examples how material artefacts can help us understand television’s history more fully.

Keywords: broadcasting, engineering, television, conservation, restoration, preservation

How to Cite: Marshall, P., 2019. Making Old Television Technology Make Sense. VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, 8(15), pp.32–45. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

Article

Read the article here: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

ABC Television at Didsbury

Dicky Howett recalls a little piece of ABC Television at Didsbury.

In a residential street on the outskirts of Manchester there used to stand the production base of ABC Television. (You remember ABC Television? Come on now, that was back in the days when ITV was ITV!). Demolition, it seems, is the pre-ordained fate of most pioneer tv establishments. For example, A-R tv’s Wembley got razed and recently, the big double production space known as ‘Studio Five’. Teddington Studios became an upmarket riverside residential enclave; Television Centre – sold for a pittance; the London Studios are not what they used to be; Lime Grove bit the dust and Alexandra Palace… well who knows? However, redundancy is the name of the game and sentiment doesn’t enter the balance sheet.

Continue reading “ABC Television at Didsbury”

Interlacing – the hidden story of 1920s video compression technology

By Paul Marshall

Pick-up any worthwhile book on the history of television and turn to the index to look up the word ‘interlace’ or ‘interlacing’. Look at the referenced pages and somewhere you will find an established ‘fact’ that Randall Ballard of RCA invented the ‘clever’ technique of interlacing in 1932. It doesn’t matter whether the book is American, British, German, French or Russian – Randall Ballard invented interlacing. Is this ‘fact’ completely sound though? As with so many issues in the history of the technological development of television the rights to precedence have become distorted over the years by manipulations of corporate image, tweaking for reasons of national pride or just plain acceptance of the status quo.

Continue reading “Interlacing – the hidden story of 1920s video compression technology”