David Taylor’s Postfade website

Richard has been in contact with David Taylor who runs the PostFade website. On the site he looks at broadcast and recorded sound, exploring the techniques from the 1950s and 1960s to the present.

He joined the Anglia Television sound department in the summer of 1966 and closed his ‘Postfade Sound’ television post production suite in 2012.

The articles on his site are mainly concerned with sound, but cameras, vehicles and lighting also feature.

Making Old Television Technology Make Sense

A new approach to technological television history and conservation

By Dr Paul Marshall

Abstract

How does traditional analogue television work? That’s a question beyond the comfort zone of most media historians who may not be familiar with analogue electronics. Even young engineers know little of thermionics, cathode rays and a myriad of other forgotten technologies. This important facet of television’s history is now only recorded by older engineers and by amateur groups who collect these technologies. In this paper, I will show by using examples how material artefacts can help us understand television’s history more fully.

Keywords: broadcasting, engineering, television, conservation, restoration, preservation

How to Cite: Marshall, P., 2019. Making Old Television Technology Make Sense. VIEW Journal of European Television History and Culture, 8(15), pp.32–45. DOI: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

Article

Read the article here: http://doi.org/10.18146/2213-0969.2019.jethc163

Central News follow-up

ITV Central News have posted another video to YouTube, this one is a follow-up item about the event at BCU.

It includes interviews with Chris Perry of Kaleidoscope, Michael Steele and Dr Paul Marshall of BECG.