New articles

We have added some new articles recently:

  • Jeffrey and Paul have followed up their BVWS article Carry On Trucking with a new one looking at Vivat in particular: Long Live Vivat!
  • Trevor Brown has kindly sent us some more articles from CQ-DATV:
    • The Lightweight Revolution looks at the rise of Electronic News Gathering.
    • Five go to Amsterdam recalls an earlier life when we took a RCA TR70-B VTR and a Marconi Mk VII camera to IBC in Amsterdam – we billed it as “the world’s largest camcorder”!
  • Dan Cranefield continues his reminiscences with Early Location Drama in Colour, which dovetails with Richard’s Roving Eye article as it also discusses the conversion of Roving Eye 5 into the LMCR.

Long Live Vivat!

Long live Vivat! – Jeffrey Borinsky and Paul Marshall

When we wrote about some of our outside broadcast (OB) trucks in the Winter 2019 Bulletin, we said a little about Vivat, our oldest truck, but this fascinating project deserves a closer look. It is a re-creation, as near as is technically possible, of an OB truck that was used at the Queen’s coronation on 2 June 1953.

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Roving Eye article updated again

Richard’s Roving Eye article continues to evolve, with more history appearing!

Updates include:

  • REII photographs at Fairoaks Airfield, Chobham for a stunt flying programme from Brian Balshaw.
  • REII photographs from Pat Jessup.
  • NYN 286Y is transferred to Pebble Mill, for Top Gear.
  • Some re-arrangement of the sections to improve the time-lines.
  • More on the proposed CRE rebuild.

My “Palace of Arts” Days

By Dan Cranefield, Senior Engineering Manager, BBC Tel OBs

BBC-Palace-of-Arts-Wembley
The Palace of Arts, Wembley during the 1948 Olympics.
Photo: BBC Archive via web.archive.org.

After the war BBC Television Outside Broadcasts (Tel OBs) operated from their base at the Palace of Arts in Wembley, one of the substantial buildings which were built there specially for the British Empire Exhibition in 1924. Some of these buildings were put to other uses later on.

Continue reading “My “Palace of Arts” Days”